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Interest on the deposit and inflation

Money can be put into the banking account for interest. E.g., for a year. Besides, everybody knows about inflation. And everybody intuitively understands that a hundred rubles at the end of the year are not the same as 100 rubles at the beginning of the same year - you can buy less for the same amount. Let's try to understand whether it's profitable to put money into the bank account to get your interest at the end of the year. In 2007, the inflation rate in Russia was 11.9%. E.g., we put 10 000 rubles in the bank for a year at 9% per annum (compound interest accrued monthly - the most profitable option), at the end of the year we will get about 10 938 rubles. However, it's equal to 9 716 rubles at the beginning of the year. In other words, the obtained 10 938 rubles at the end of the year equal in the purchasing power to 9 716 at the beginning of the same year. But we had 10 000 rubles, and at the beginning of the year, we could have bought more by 284 rubles :(
Anyone willing to play around with the figures can do it in the calculator below:

PLANETCALC, Interest on the deposit and inflation

Interest on the deposit and inflation

Digits after the decimal point: 2
Accreted amount
 
Accreted amount reduced to the beginning of the period including inflation
 

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Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License 3.0 (Unported) PLANETCALC, Interest on the deposit and inflation

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