homechevron_rightStudychevron_rightChemistry

Molar volume

This calculator calculates molar volume of an ideal gas at different conditions (temperature and pressure)

This online calculator calculates the molar volume of an ideal gas at different conditions (different temperature and pressure).

The calculation uses the ideal gas equation:
V_m=\frac{V}{n}=\frac{RT}{P}

Ideal gas equation is a good approximation for many common gases. And, for a given temperature and pressure, the molar volume is the same for all ideal gases and is known to the same precision as the gas constant: R = 0.082 057 338(47) L atm K−1 mol−1, that is a relative standard uncertainty of 5.7×10−7, according to the 2014 CODATA recommended value1

Since it is the same for all gases, it can be pre-calculated for most commonly used conditions. That is, for STP, standard temperature and pressure (273.15 K, 101.325 kPa), the molar volume of an ideal gas is 22.413962x10-3 m3 mol-1 with standard uncertainty 0.000013 x 10-3 m3 mol-12

For convenience I've listed molar volume for several other commonly used conditions in the table below.

Condition AKA Temperature Pressure Molar volume, liters
Standard Temperature and Pressure (NIST) STP 0C (273.15K) 101.325kPa (1atm) 22.414
Standard Temperature and Pressure (IUPAC) STP 0C (273.15K) 100.000kPa (1bar) 22.711
Normal Temperature and Pressure NTP 20C (293.15K) 101.325kPa (1atm) 24.055
Standard Ambient Temperature and Pressure SATP 25C (298.15K) 101.325kPa (1atm) 24.465

There are also terms like RTP - room temperature and pressure and SLC - standard laboratory conditions, however, there is no single definition for them, and different organizations can use different definitions. Using this calculator, you can calculate molar volume of a gas for arbitrary temperature and pressure. Just note that for big values (hundreds of atmospheres and thousands of degrees) real gases divert from ideal gas law (that's why they are not "ideal") and this formula can't be used.

PLANETCALC, Molar volume of a gas

Molar volume of a gas

Digits after the decimal point: 3
Molar volume, liters
 

Comments